W. Douglas Robinson

• Email:
douglas.robinson@oregonstate.edu

• My position with AOS:
Chair, International Committee

• My current full-time title and institution:
Bob and Phyllis Mace Professor, Oregon State University

• My current career stage:
Mid-Career Professional

• My lineage of mentors/labs:
George H. Waring (masters)
Scott K. Robinson (PhD)
Jeffrey D. Brawn (PhD)

• #badlyexplainyourjob:
I time travel with birds. Count and map birds now. Archive the data. 100 years from now someone else will do it again and thank me.

• My favorite bird and why:
The one with feathers. They are all interesting.

• I am involved with AOS because:
The most important and active bird society on the planet.

• The best part about being a member of AOS is:
Associating with kindred souls.

• Birds are important to me because:
I cannot help it. I am just designed to think they are important. In the same way Trump thinks money and getting his way are important. 😉

• Advice I have to offer a student (master’s level or younger) in ornithology:
Read, read, read, read. Then start writing and never stop.

• One ornithology question or problem I would like to solve or see solved:
How many birds on the planet?

• Fun random fact about myself:
I won first place in 6 athletic events at school in 5th grade. Sounds great, except that it was a special athletic event for the kids who were not away from school that week at the regional track competition.

Jordan Giese

Jordan Giese with a white-tipped dove, his M.S. study species

• Email:
jgiese@iastate.edu

• Twitter Handle:
@birdnbiologist

• Website/Blog/Etc:
Nest predation videos from Jordan’s M.S. project

• My position with AOS:
Communications Committee Member

• My current full-time title and institution:
PhD Researcher, Iowa State University

• My current career stage:
Graduate Student

• My lineage of mentors/labs:
Dr. John Quinn research crew (undergrad)
Dr. Heather Mathewson lab (M.S.)
Dr. Lisa Schulte-Moore lab (Ph.D.)

• #badlyexplainyourjob:
I examine the birds and the bees. Prairie birds and bees that is.

• My favorite bird and why:
Plain Chachalaca. Is there a cooler bird name?

• I am involved with AOS because:
Research and networking. And a great excuse to travel.

• Birds are important to me because:
Birds are important to me because of their diversity and ability to serve as indicators of ecosystem health. They’re also a great way to connect to people.

Jordan Giese banding a white-tipped dove

• Advice I have to offer a student (master’s level or younger) in ornithology:
Don’t be afraid to get out of your comfort zone whether that means moving to a new place or studying new taxa.

• One ornithology question or problem I would like to solve or see solved:
How do we balance avian conservation and AG production for a growing population?

• Fun random fact about myself:
Lived on the border of Mexico for 2 summers researching White-tipped Doves.

• Something else birdy I’d like to share:
Loved my M.S. field work in the Lower Rio Grande Valley. The website I entered is my youtube page with some of the nest predation videos from my work there.

Scott Stoleson

Scott Stoleson banding swamp sparrows

• Email:
sstoleson@fs.fed.us

• Website/Blog/Etc:
https://www.nrs.fs.fed.us/people/sstoleson

• My position with AOS:
Student Research Awards Committee

• My current full-time title and institution:
Research Wildlife Ecologist, USDA Forest Service,
Northern Research Station

• My current career stage:
Mid-Career Professional

• My lineage of mentors/labs:
Undergrad: Dartmouth College — advisor: Richard Holmes
Graduate School: Yale University — advisor: Steve Beissinger

• #badlyexplainyourjob:
I research anthropogenic effects on birds and suggest mitigation strategies so we can continue destroying things but still have birds

• My favorite bird and why:
Northern Goshawk. Why? Ever see one?

• I am involved with AOS because:
It is the largest and most prestigious ornithological society in the world

• The best part about being a member of AOS is:
Engaging with other bird-brains

• Birds are important to me because:
Birds provide the best examples of evolutionary radiation, behavioral and physiological adaptions, and warning signs of unhealthy ecosystems

• Advice I have to offer a student (master’s level or younger) in ornithology:
Experience multiple systems, explore multiple questions, and then find a good graduate advisor

• One ornithology question or problem I would like to solve or see solved:
Why do we even have Starlings in North America?

• Fun random fact about myself:
I’ve been chased by white-tipped sharks. Not fun.

 

Sharon Gill

• Email:
sharon.gill@wmich.edu

• Twitter Handle:
@birdsoundscapes

• Website/Blog/Etc:
http://birdsoundscapes.wixsite.com
/gilllabwmu

• My position with AOS:
Assistant Editor for The Auk
Member of AOS Student Research Awards Committee
Chair, Scientific Program for the 2017 AOS-SCO-SOC meeting

• My current full-time title and institution:
Associate professor at Western Michigan University

• My current career stage:
Mid-Career Professional

• My lineage of mentors/labs:
Spencer Sealy (undergrad, MSc, University of Manitoba)
Bridget Stutchbury (PhD, York University)
Michaela Hau (postdoc, Princeton)

• #badlyexplainyourjob:
I record sounds of birds and the environment. Sounds tell me things – why birds make sounds & how human activities affect them

• My favorite bird and why:
When I teach ornithology, id’ing my favorite bird becomes a running joke with my class. Apparently every species I mention is my favorite…

• I am involved with AOS because:
I’ve been a member since my MSc and it’s the society I feel most connected to.

• The best part about being a member of AOS is:
Being part of a community which has really diverse research interests, but with a common focus on birds.

• Birds are important to me because:
When I hear birds, I feel that nature is with me. Birds make me feel connected to the larger world.

• Advice I have to offer a student (master’s level or younger) in ornithology:
Find a mentor who interested in your goals and helps you to reach them.
Work hard. Play hard.
Be kind.

• One ornithology question or problem I would like to solve or see solved:
How do we develop public concern and political will to stop and reverse species declines and extinctions?

• Fun random fact about myself:
I’m studying metal sculpture. Ask me about welding!

 

Ted R. Anderson

Ted Anderson
Ted Anderson searching diligently but unsuccessfully for the elusive and endangered Florida scrub jay.

• Email:
ted020@centurytel.net

• My position with AOS:
In Memoriam Editor of Auk and Condor

• My current full-time title and institution:
Emeritus Professor Biology, McKendree University

• My current career stage:
Retired

• My lineage of mentors/labs:
BA in zoology from University of Kansas, took Ornithology from Richard Johnston.
PhD in biology from Saint Louis Univeristy supervised by James Mulligan

• #badlyexplainyourjob:
Taught undergraduate biology at McKendree for 32 years, and also taught Ornithology courses at Reis Biological Station in Ozarks and Univeristy of Michigan Biological Station as Visiting Professor. Studied community and reproductive ecology of house sparrows and Eurasian tree sparros in US and Poland. Wrote Biology of the Ubiquitous House Sparrow (OUP 2006) and The Life of David Lack (OUP 2013).

• My favorite bird and why:
The house sparrow, of course. Saying anything else after 50 years of studying the species would be to insult the house sparrow. Loved working with them because of their accessability and ease of obtaining large sample sizes.

• I am involved with AOS because:
Joined the AOU in 1963 as an undergraduate, and have also been a member of Cooper, Wilson and Field Ornitholgists Societies. Their journals have been a primary source for accessing the bird literature, and the societies serve as an effective networking means (better than Linkedin) for bird people.

• The best part about being a member of AOS is:
The members!

• Birds are important to me because:
I have been interested in birds since I spent time on my grandparents farm in central Kansas. The wide open spaces of Kansas mean that birds are more conspicuous there than in forested areas—my explanation for why so many professional ornithologists have come from Kansas. I am particularly fond of their vocalizations, not surprising once you realize that I’m a blind ornithologist.

• Advice I have to offer a student (master’s level or younger) in ornithology:
Find a species or set of species that you love to work with—it helps to foster the passion that you need to be successful in spite of problems that inevitably emerge when you are doing research.